Sunday, 17 September 2017

The Dangers Of Forest Fires

You’ll get amazed of all the wonderful things happening on our planet. All living things big or small make our life so much fun and exciting. However, it’s not always rainbows and butterflies and everything nice. There are cons to living too. Whether it is pollution, human’s evil side, and the wrath of Mother Nature in the form of destructive natural calamities, one can easily perish in an instant if you happen to be in the wrong place at the wrong time.

One of the most understated calamities that can either be man-made or a natural one is forest fires. It can burn millions of acres of land and cross states if the conditions permit. Many animals are displaced because of it and even humans too that live in rural areas and happen to be living nearby. Also known as wildfires or bush fires, forest fires are simply fires happening in rural areas or the countryside that is rich in combustible plants and vegetation. And it is not a new phenomenon because wildfires have been happening for millions of years ago – ever since terrestrial plants first appeared on earth.

This summer, a searing heat wave has helped spawn major fires in the Balkans, parts of Italy and Spain, and southern France and Corsica, as a changing climate affects countries across Southern Europe.

But Portugal has become a particularly stark case of what the future may hold if changes to land, climate and economies go mismanaged.

The deaths in June provoked a fresh round of soul-searching and spurred an investigation, still continuing, into how and why the wildfire engulfed Pedrógão Grande, about 10 miles from where Mr. Muralha lives, close to Oleiros.

Oleiros and its environs are a prime example of the changes to the landscape that have rendered Portugal ever more vulnerable to fire.

The area is a hub for the country’s wood industry. The hamlet where Mr. Muralha lives has just 12 residents, down from about 180 in the 1960s, he said.

(Via: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/08/12/world/europe/portugal-forest-fires-pedrogao-grande.html)

Bush fires aren’t just a problem faced by rural dwellers in the United States but in other parts of the world as well. Most of the time, it takes years and decades of rehabilitation before a place struck by such a calamity eventually recovers. It is a concerted effort by the government, NGOs and the community as a whole alongside the natural ability of the landscape to heal and recover. Trees don’t grow in a day or two. It takes months and even years for some to reach a towering height that is characteristic of trees in the forest.

More than 3,000 firefighters struggled yesterday to put out forest fires across Portugal, after the country requested assistance from Europe to fight blazes that threaten to spread with more hot weather in the coming days.
Exceptionally dry and hot weather ignited
Portugal’s worst fire disaster in memory early this summer, killing 64 people, and fires have continued to flare up in recent weeks with the arrival of each new hotter spell of weather.
Interior Minister Constanca Urbana de Sousa said the country sent the request for help to Europe late on Saturday because of concerns that high temperatures and high winds in the coming days could increase the number of fires.
The minister said the request was carried out “because of a question of prudence” due to the weather forecast for coming days, according to news agency Lusa.
It covered requests for firefighting airplanes and firemen and is part of a European mechanism for co-operation to fight fires.

(Via: http://www.gulf-times.com/story/560130/Portugal-asks-for-help-to-battle-forest-fires)

Not only does the environment suffer in the wake of widespread bushfires but it has an effect on the country’s economy as well. Since some of the natural and raw resources we use in various industries can be found in most forests, it is easy to understand how devastating losing access to these resources is when the forest is now devoid of life. And don’t get me started on the harmful gases it emits that contribute to global warming. The list can go on and on.

However, as damaging as it may be, wildfires actually serve a crucial role in shaping various ecosystems by initiating change to take place. So, no matter how difficult it may be, don’t hesitate in planting anew after tragedies like bushfires. Ensure that dead and burnt trees are removed from the ground. http://www.allcleartree.com/removal may be of help as tree removal is their expertise. Only then can new trees be planted if the old ones are no longer there.

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Sunday, 10 September 2017

The Story About The Joshua Tree

The planet is full of mysteries the human mind can’t always comprehend. From the intricate design of the planet to the interesting inter-relationships among various species, your mind is blown over and over again as to how we manage to coexist alongside each other, although not always peacefully. Like the Joshua tree, for instance, it has helped shape California’s the Mojave Desert along with its ever faithful companion, the Yucca moths. The symbiotic (win-win) relationship between various species has helped fill the world with living things big and small that live alongside us humans.

It’s funny how even the tiniest of living things can have a big impact on the world. In this case, the Yucca moth helped the Joshua tree pollinate and in the process co-evolved. Experts attest to the fact that their relationship has been going on for years as both need one another for survival. Yucca moth caterpillars only have the Joshua tree seeds for sustenance and the latter won’t be able to thrive without the aid of the moths in pollination.

But in the vast world of plants and their pollinators, there was one example that Darwin deemed the “most wonderful case of fertilisation ever published” in a letter to botanist Joseph Dalton Hooker. This was the curious case of the Joshua tree and the yucca moth. 

We’ll start with the Joshua tree, the Mojave Desert’s most iconic plant. With its spiny fronds and clubbed tufts topped by pungent, waxy flowers twisting towards the desert sky, this desert-adapted shrub has a reputation for otherworldliness. Everyone who passes through the desert remembers the majestic Joshua tree; its namesake has inspired artists, filmmakers and many a sojourner in search of transcendence. 

Few travelers, however, wax poetic about its evolutionary partner, the yucca moth. The small, dun bug is initially unassuming, but upon closer inspection, it is an equally extraterrestrial match for the iconic Joshua tree. Instead of a regular mouthpiece, it sports bizarre, tentacle-like fronds, the likes of which are unique among insects—and serve an essential purpose in the desert ecosystem. 

(Via: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/how-tree-and-its-moth-shaped-mojave-desert-180964452/)

The world works in mysterious ways, indeed. There are many things that happen around us that we are totally clueless of because some are so minuscule we can’t possibly see it with our naked eyes but they contribute greatly to the planet. The humble Joshua tree managed to survive for years just with the help of the Yucca moth and same with the latter.

Some 2 million people flock to southern California's Joshua Tree National Park every year to see its namesake flora and experience its unforgiving desert environment—but those who leave before sundown are missing out. At night the sky comes alive with stars and now it is being officially recognized as an "International Dark Sky Park," a designation given by the International Dark-Sky Association (IDA) to "a land possessing an exceptional or distinguished quality of starry nights and a nocturnal environment that is specifically protected for its scientific, natural, educational, cultural heritage, and/or public enjoyment."

As Desert Sun, a subsidiary of USA Today, reported, Joshua Tree will officially join the list of over 50 other Dark Sky Parks around the world, which draw stargazers and astronomers for clear views of our galaxy, at a ceremony at Joshua Tree's Copper Mountain College on August 12. So why doesn't every remote outpost around the world get the designation? To be a designated Dark Sky Park, the communities that surround it have to actively contribute to minimizing light pollution.

(Via: http://www.cntraveler.com/story/joshua-tree-national-park-to-get-dark-sky-park-designation-for-stargazing)

Aside from the rich history and nature of the tree itself, the place where this tree only grows is also famous as an “International Dark Sky Park” – meaning it is a great place to watch starry nights. It is more reason to head to this renowned park, if not to see the Joshua tree up close but to experience what it is like to see the night-sky away from the blinding city lights. The residents living nearby do their part in ensuring there is little light traffic in the place to preserve its natural light once night time falls.

While trees are welcome in the far rural areas of California where the Joshua tree grows, it’s not the same in San Diego. Some trees can be a bother to the residents, which is why it needs to be removed. For times like this, contact a professional here: http://www.allcleartree.com/removal because you may get hurt cutting down a tree if you do not know what you are doing. Better let the pros deal with it and wait for all the mess to be cleared after. Trees serve their purpose, so when they don’t anymore it is fine to take them down.

The blog post The Story About The Joshua Tree Read more on: AllClearTree.com



source http://www.allcleartree.com/removal/story-joshua-tree

Sunday, 3 September 2017

Trees Dry Up During The Hot Summer Months

Trees are living things as well like us humans. They have needs that must be met in order to grow and thrive in an increasingly inhospitable planet. It also means that they get affected too by a myriad of factors that likewise affects human beings. The climate, pollution, human activities, etc. all make survival doubly harder for every single one of us. Imagine yourself suffering from the extreme heat at this time of the year. You are not alone. Trees feel the heat too and if you just give them the time of day and look a little closer, you’d see them drying up from top to bottom.

Our first instinct is to increase our water intake to fight the heat. It makes perfect sense actually and it is probably our survival instinct taking over that we immediately reach out for a cool and refreshing glass of water to quench our thirst and beat the heat. Plants need as much water too. Seeing tree trunks and barks drying and cracking is a strong indicator that it is likewise in dire need of water and some TLC.

It’s been several weeks since Grande Prairie has seen significant rainfall, and its starting to show. The city’s parks department says local trees are showing signs of drought stress, which is forcing some into early dormancy.

Some of the symptoms include yellowing leaves and dying branches, and without some relief, they could be killed over the winter. The city is asking residents to consider watering their trees and shrubs over the next few days to help, as they will need enough reserves to last them through to next spring.

In order to properly water a tree, people should turn their hose to a trickle, and leave it where rain would normally drip off of its branches. It should be left in several spots for a total of an hour.

“Grass consumes a significant amount of water so shallow, frequent watering does little to
help trees” it’s explained in a release. “Deep, infrequent watering (once every two weeks for mature trees) is much more effective.”

(Via: http://www.mygrandeprairienow.com/31335/dry-conditions-causing-tree-stress/)

But while watering plants and trees help them overcome the heat and lets them stay hydrated all day-long, it isn’t always an easy thing to do. First, droughts are becoming quite common now, so water is becoming more of a precious commodity that no longer always comes for free. Then, the summer months are longer and more intense perhaps because of climate change. Once trees lose their color, dry up, and begin to wilt, they become susceptible as well to disease and insect infestation. Even the oldest and biggest of trees have a hard time staying healthy during long and dry summer spells.

As the number of droughts increases globally, scientists are working to develop predictions of how future parched conditions will affect plants, especially trees.

New results published today in the journal Nature Ecology and Evolution by 62 scientists, led by Henry Adams at Oklahoma State University, synthesized research from drought manipulation studies and revealed the mechanisms by which tree deaths happen.

"Understanding drought is critical to managing our nation's forests," says Lina Patino, a section head in the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Division of Earth Sciences, which co-funded the study through its Critical Zone Observatories program. "This research will help us more accurately predict how trees will respond to environmental stresses, whether drought, insect damage or disease."

Adds Liz Blood, director of NSF's MacroSystems Biology program, which co-funded the research, "Droughts are simultaneously happening over large regions of the globe, affecting forests with very different trees. The discovery of how droughts cause mortality in trees, regardless of the type of tree, allows us to make better regional-scale predictions of droughts' effects on forests."

(Via: https://www.nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=242634)

When it is the time of the year when the heat is just too much and you can’t possibly move a tree somewhere else cooler, try to eliminate any other factors that can cause further stress to the tree like creepy, crawling insects. And while we like to believe that water is the answer to trees drying issues, there is a proper method to watering down a tree. Water it gradually and at soil level. Sprinklers aren’t ideal since only the top soil is soaked and the tree roots remain all dried up. Avoid over-watering it down too since it can drown the tree especially when the surrounding soil already appears soaked with water.

Trees that already died because of the heat and can no longer be salvaged better be removed from the land. Stumps can be problematic, though, as they are huge and grow deep into the ground. Experts at stump removal can help you with this one as they have the knowledge, skills, and manpower on how to do this right. http://www.allcleartree.com/stump-removal is a cost-effective way to get these dead tree stumps removed for good. Now, you can keep on caring for your (still) live and breathing trees and not waste your time, effort, and resources in something that is long gone.

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source http://www.allcleartree.com/removal/trees-dry-hot-summer-months

Tuesday, 29 August 2017

Build The Treehouse Of Your Dreams

Our childhood was often filled with laughter, imagination, active play and lots of adventure back in the days. We actually went out of the house to have a good time. Looking back, our childhood wasn’t so bad at all. It is a stark contradiction to how kids pass their time these days. Most youngsters are glued to their smart gadgets and totally immersed in their virtual life.

But we can change that. As adults, we can recreate our childhood and let our kids have a great time without the use of technology all the time. For starters, why not take away their gadgets and limit their use daily. When they don’t have their gadgets to tinker with, kids will be forced to use their imagination to entertain themselves and actually do something else with their hands. And a tree house fits the purpose of livening up their childhood to a T.

“The treehouse just grew up,” says host Pete Nelson at the start of Animal Planet’s “Treehouse Masters” — and he means it.

Just as comic book superheroes and video games have been absorbed into the adult world, “Treehouse Masters” allows grownups to enjoy an enduring symbol of American childhood.

The entertaining and informative show, which has aired over 70 episodes since 2013 and was just renewed for a new season, follows the treehouse-building exploits of Nelson, who is owner of Nelson Treehouse and Supply in Fall City, Washington, where he’s surrounded by some of the world’s most gorgeous forests. Picture an outdoorsy Mr. Rogers after a few cups of coffee —that’s Nelson. He brings a kid-like enthusiasm to a kid-like endeavor, but with distinctly mature twists.

(Via: https://www.lifezette.com/popzette/treehouses-have-never-looked-good-this-show-knows-it/)

The funny thing about building tree houses is the joy it gives to the adult aside from that of the child. Often times you’d see the adult showing more emotion than their kids. Indeed, it is a great way for a parent and a child to bond. You can stay up in the tree house and make up all sorts of adventure in your own little make believe world. Kids and adults alike can also use this space as their cozy getaway when they want to be just by themselves and do some self-reflection, reading, or just about anything else they want to.

Dozens of volunteers in the village of Hamburg on Friday began building a $450,000 playground that will be more than your average swing set and slide.

The Hamburg Community Playground will be "a true destination playground," playground committee member Jennifer Gallardo predicted during the planning.

With five slides, swings, ring climber, spinner and a two-way zip line, tight rope bridge, fire pole and more, there should be something for every child when it's built.

(Via: http://buffalonews.com/2017/04/28/construction-starts-hamburg-community-playground/)

But what if an entire community pledges to realize such an ambitious feat for young kids to play with? The result is an epic tree house where kids can get lost for hours while enjoying themselves and honing their muscular agility and dexterity at a young age.

It's a common-sense rule of treehouse construction: Make it lightweight. So I felt some stirrings of anxiety when the stocky, bearded sawmill owner pulled up to the house with a flatbed trailer stacked with oak timbers. Full of water, densely grained and smelling like bourbon, the rough-cut framing lumber I'd ordered spanned 18 feet and looked like bridge supports. As we offloaded the first 2 x 8, each of us taking an end in hand, I smiled doggedly to mask the strain I felt. He peered over the garden fence past the lilac bushes, and politely asked, "What kind of treehouse are you building?"

One thing was certain: It wouldn't look much like the rickety aeries of my childhood, hammered together out of whatever construction scraps and packing crates we neighborhood kids could scrounge up. (The most ambitious of these was a three-story fort spanning a creek and topped by a crow's-nest made from an old kitchen chair nailed to the trunk.) This time, I'd enjoy the advantages of milled lumber and a carpenter's square and level, not to mention power tools. Yet I hoped to match the spirit of those earlier tree forts with a rustic structure where my children could waste their afternoons dreaming up rules to games I'd never understand or even hear about.

(Via: http://www.popularmechanics.com/home/how-to-plans/how-to/a5490/how-to-build-a-treehouse/)

Make a plan and determine what your tree house will look like before rolling your sleeves and start working on it. Pick a sturdy platform because that will serve as your tree house’s base. While the tree house will likely be frequented by youngsters, it should still be strong enough to carry their combined weights and even survive inclement weather. It’s a treat for kids to have their own tree house where they can hang out with their friends and make pretend play. It’s one of the best gifts any parent can give to their children instead of buying them yet another gadget that is just as pricey. The memories they can make from their own little fort is priceless.

On the other hand, if a tree is proving to be a major obstruction in your home and poses a security threat, having it cut down is unavoidable. When that happens, you can contact http://www.allcleartree.com/removal for professional tree removal help because things like this can go from bad to worse fast, so better let the pros deal with it right from the start.

The article Build The Treehouse Of Your Dreams was originally published on http://www.allcleartree.com/



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Tuesday, 15 August 2017

The World Needs More Trees For Humans To Survive

Trees are here for various reasons. During ancient times, trees provided food and shelter to both man and animals. Fruit-bearing trees provided us with tasty and juicy fruits to satisfy our hunger and give us the energy we need to pursue our various interests in life. And when we started using tools, we cut down trees and fashioned them in different forms like in building homes and furniture making. Trees also provide excellent shade for all forms of life especially when the heat of the sun is too much and we need a temporary relief from it once in a while.

But if there is one more thing that we need most from trees for human life to flourish is the oxygen it produces. Man will perish if there is no more oxygen in the planet. The same thing can be said if carbon output shoots up way, way, way above normal. Unfortunately, that is the reality we are now facing in the world. CO₂ levels in the atmosphere are so high it is almost impossible to bring them back to normal range even if we keep on planting new trees.

Humans emit roughly 30 to 40 billion tons of the greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide, into the atmosphere each year. If we keep it up, Earth will continue to heat up and ultimately devastate our way of life.

So what can we do about it?

Most scientists agree that we need a way to capture some of that CO2 out of the atmosphere. One idea is to plant lots of trees. Trees use CO2 in order to grow. They also release oxygen, so it's a win-win.

But recent reports indicate that we simply can't grow enough trees to capture the necessary amount of CO2 that would help us meet the goals set by the Paris Agreement.

In truth, we would have to cover the entire contiguous US with trees just to capture 10% of the CO2 we emit annually.

(Via: http://www.businessinsider.com/so-much-co2-planting-trees-cant-save-us-2017-5)

But planting these trees isn’t as easy as A-B-C or 1-2-3. For starters, we don’t have enough space on the planet to plant these trees that can totally wipe out all the carbon emissions in the atmosphere. And most of the land is also used for planting crops. If we don’t plant crops, we starve. If we don’t plant trees, mankind may ultimately die. We are currently trapped in this confusing dilemma.

A new report from the Potsdam Institute in Germany shows that planting trees and other plants to absorb carbon dioxide from the atmosphere cannot substitute for cutting carbon emissions.

Growing trees and other kinds of "biomass" have been thought of as an effective countermeasure against our rising global carbon emissions. In fact, countries that preserve forests or green spaces can receive carbon credits that they can trade or sell to other countries that are polluters. 

The researchers looked at several scenarios. One was the the "business-as-usual" scenario, in which greenhouse gas emissions continue to rise at current rates, and which scientists fear could lead to a global average temperature rise of 4.5 C by 2100. They found that if we want trees to absorb all that extra carbon, even if we converted all of our agricultural land to biomass cultivation, it cannot be done without experiencing the "most dire consequences for food production or the biosphere."

(Via: http://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/trees-carbon-emissions-bob-mcdonald-1.4132679)

The rationale to this massive tree planting concept is because tree needs carbon dioxide to build their tissues. In return, they release oxygen that is needed by man for survival. Our increasingly advancing technology has resulted in carbon emissions that have severely clouded the atmosphere and has endangered everyone living on the planet because of climate change. Unfortunately, even if we cover every open space in the planet with trees, it won’t be able to totally eradicate all the carbon emissions already clouding the atmosphere right now.

As of now, we haven’t found a solution yet on how to address this problem because there are numerous challenges that must first be overcome and they aren’t easy hurdles too. However, it won’t hurt if you plant more trees when you can and do your part in saving the world in your own little ways. But on the contrary, when the presence of a tree presents more harm than good, don’t hesitate to cut it down because ultimately, human life is still more valuable than it. Contact http://www.allcleartree.com/removal for expert yet affordable assistance on tree removal to ensure that no one gets hurt in the process. Try to help out Mother Nature in many other ways because as of now, it needs all the help it can get.

The blog post The World Needs More Trees For Humans To Survive is republished from allcleartree.com



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Tuesday, 8 August 2017

Trump No Longer In Agreement With The Paris Climate Accord

US President Donald Trump’s colorful personality and controversial opinions have captured the attention of many over the years. Despite his many flaws, though, one can not argue his love for his country. It’s this passion for the land of the free and the home of the brave that helped him win the presidential seat against a veteran in politics like Hillary Clinton. The ones who voted for him truly believed that Trump can deliver his promise of making America great again but is he doing a good job at it now.

Unfortunately, his performance ever since he assumed office isn’t impressive at all. What he has accomplished so far was use up a big chunk of the nation’s resources in tracking down and deporting illegal immigrants, shutting the border from refugees, cutting down the budget on government agencies he does not consider to be important like the education, arts, and even the US Environmental Protection Agency as well as issue more travel bans that only resulted to the Trump Slump.

Donald Trump, who called climate change “a hoax” during his campaign, has withdrawn the United States from the Paris Climate Agreement, rejecting a pact that is being honored by more than 190 nations.

The U.S. signed and ratified the agreement under President Obama, and it is a pact that is also heavily backed by U.S. and global corporations, including oil companies ExxonMobil, BP, and Royal Dutch Shell.

The U.S., the world’s second largest producer of greenhouse gases after China, committed in Paris to cutting its carbon emissions by between 26 to 28 percent from 2005 levels by 2025.

Trump justified his reversal of the U.S. commitment made to the world in Paris with the wholly unsubstantiated claim that the agreement is bad for U.S. business and labor.

The Paris Agreement aims at preventing dangerous climate change and keeping the world well below a 2 degree Celsius (3.6 degree Fahrenheit) average temperature rise over preindustrial levels. Studies have shown that the emission cuts volunteered by the world’s nations in Paris are still deeply inadequate for meeting that goal, and Trump’s move will only steepen the very difficult climb to climate stability and safety.

(Via: https://news.mongabay.com/2017/06/trump-withdraws-u-s-from-paris-climate-accord-scientists-respond/)

This recent move from Trump is no longer surprising considering how vocal he was in saying that climate change is just a hoax for government organizations to get more money and federal support. However, he shouldn’t let his personal biases cloud his judgment when millions of lives rely on his decisions. He is the voice of America. So, are we now ready to face the implications of his decision to get out of the Paris Climate Agreement?

The U.S.’s withdrawal could prompt other countries to reconsider their contributions. Or it could have the opposite effect. The Trump Administration is leaving the energy technologies of the future to other countries to develop, and many nations see an economic opportunity. As the headline of a recent post on Foreign Policy’s Web site put it,“If Trump Dumps the Paris Accord, China Will Rule the Energy Future.” It is telling that several of the U.S.’s largest tech companies, including Apple, Google, Microsoft, and Intel, signed an open letter to Trump, urging him to “keep the United States in the Paris Agreement.” The letter states, “By expanding markets for innovative clean technologies, the agreement generates jobs and economic growth.” On Tuesday, Apple’s chief executive, Tim Cook, reportedly put in a call to the President, urging him to remain in the agreement.

In another open letter to the President, which ran as a full-page ad in the Wall Street Journal, the heads of thirty other mammoth companies, including 3M, Cargill, Bank of America, and Morgan Stanley, wrote to express their “strong support for the United States remaining in the Paris Climate Agreement.” The C.E.O.s said that they were concerned about the “strong potential for negative trade implications if the United States exits from the Paris Agreement.”

(Via: http://www.newyorker.com/news/daily-comment/au-revoir-trump-exits-the-paris-climate-accord)

Trump’s flair for drama or his unorthodox view on things is not doing the country any good so far. He should remember that his actions represent the country in general and that’s how other countries see the US on the outside. Moreover, this action can cause more damage to our already deteriorating environment. Just how much everyone will suffer from this decision, we are yet to find out. Others are also concerned how other countries will react to this strange move from America. It might trigger them to do away with the agreement themselves and further harm our planet and even speed up climate change.

In as much as we want to preserve the environment and advocate for tree-planting whenever possible, there are instances when trees can also pose harm to the people around it. For example, trees can fall down because of strong winds or storms and damage properties and endanger human lives. To prevent that from happening, make sure you get those big trees trimmed down http://www.allcleartree.com/trimming with our professional help, so the risk of it falling down is reduced. Hence, you no longer need to cut down more trees when we need them more badly than ever now.

The following article Trump No Longer In Agreement With The Paris Climate Accord is republished from AllClearTree.com



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Tuesday, 1 August 2017

Fight Pollution Along Busy City Streets

Fighting pollution is a never-ending struggle in our day-to-day. Imagine you’re all dressed up for work early in the morning but you suddenly look haggard after fighting your way through traffic and the accompanying smoke from other vehicles as you step out of your car and make your way to school or work. Pollution will always be a part of city life. How unfortunate it may seem but is actually our fault.

Now, local governments are doing their best in lining city streets with trees to reduce pollution levels and make the air cleaner and healthier for the people to breathe. Even through this simple measure, the air in major thoroughfares becomes cleaner. It may be baby steps to healthier living but better to have this than nothing at all.

Trees need to be compatible with their environment to maximize their ability to survive and influence urban air quality, a new study has suggested.

Based on the findings, a team of Filipino scientists has come up with a “menu” identifying which species can withstand the air quality in seven of Metro Manila’s busiest thoroughfares: Edsa, Ortigas Avenue, Roxas Boulevard, Taft Avenue, Pasay Road, C3 and C5 Road.

The list was the product of a yearlong study which ended last year and looked at 47 tree species found on major roads. Of this number, 18 species were native or indigenous to the country.

“There is a notion that if you plant a tree, it helps the environment. But you need to plant the right tree that can adopt to the environment that we have. If we plant the wrong tree in a particular environment, if it’s not tolerant, it may die,” said Dr. Glenn Sia Su, the main proponent of the research.

(Via: http://motioncars.inquirer.net/49357/study-lists-16-pollution-tolerant-trees-7-busiest-metro-roads)

With the help of science, we may be able to implement effective and efficient programs to help solve the pollution problem in most major cities. Local government units should keep this in mind when making local policies that address this issue to ensure their efforts don’t go down the drain.

The connection between trees, human health and well-being dates back millennia. The ancient Celts worshipped in sacred groves, believing the trees would protect them from physical and spiritual harm. In Hebrew and Christian scriptures a tree of life in the Garden of Eden imparted immortality. Potted conifers helped to cleanse the air inside tuberculosis sanatoriums of nineteenth century Europe.

In recent years, scientists studying urban forests have turned up links between exposure to green space and health benefits, including fewer deaths from heart disease and respiratory diseases, fewer hospitalizations, better infant birth weights and even less crime.

“We’ve had this intuitive understanding that nature is good for us. Now we’re backing it up on an empirical level,” said Geoffrey Donovan, a resource economist with the U.S. Forest Service Pacific Northwest Research Station in Oregon.

Donovan and others are digging into the underlying science to understand the relationship between nature and health, a step they say will help guide the design of healthier cities and suburbs.

(Via: http://www.environmentalhealthnews.org/ehs/news/2017/april/trees-science-and-the-goodness-of-green-space)

We can’t deny the positive correlation between green space and optimum health of the people. Numerous studies support such claims that human health improves in the presence of nature. While it is impossible to uproot ancient trees from the rainforest and transplant them in the city, we can still plant new ones that will be effective in reducing particulate matter in the air, and eventually reduce air pollution levels.

We may take it for granted now but over time we will realize how valuable these measures are when the world is overtaken by technology in the near future. The best time to plant trees is now. It takes a long time for them to grow, so we should no longer dilly-dally and just plant them along busy city streets while we still can and make the world still livable for the generations to come.

Other times, though, trees weren’t placed in strategic locations and become a bother to people and properties as they grow and mature. They may likewise get toppled down during calamities and affect the day-to-day of tens to thousands of people. To take care of this mess and remove the tree including its stump, call the pros for help http://www.allcleartree.com/stump-removal so they can get rid of the troublesome tree and stump safely and without affecting nearby properties. It may sound easy but tree removal requires careful planning especially if it is an urban location.

The post Fight Pollution Along Busy City Streets is courtesy of All Clear Tree Service's Blog



source http://www.allcleartree.com/removal/fight-pollution-along-busy-city-streets

Sunday, 9 July 2017

Technology Comes To The Aid Of Trees

When the world started, only primitive life existed. More complex living beings appeared little by little over time. And for as long as we can remember, we have seen a thriving flora and fauna out there in the wild. These vast ecosystems have been here even before man came to be. They have provided habitat and food source to the wildlife up to the present. Unfortunately, these rainforests are receding as technology keeps on progressing.

Technology and nature often go the opposite way. You can seldom say that technology works in the favor of nature because more often than not, it does more, and even irreparable, damage than we can ever comprehend. But this time around, technology is being used in a good way by saving trees rather than cutting them down.

The Uttar Pradesh forest and environment department has decided to protect trees through a smart mobile application to be launched soon by chief minister Yogi Adityanath.

Tree felling is rampant in areas including Noida and Greater Noida and officials are unable to act against those cutting trees mindlessly for frivolous reasons because it is not easy to identify offenders.

In Noida and Greater Noida, trees are being cut for developmental projects, often without permission from the forest department. Even residents cut trees to make way for parking space. The forest department, in many cases, do not get to know about tree felling instances as there are no complaints lodged.

“Many a time, people do not file a complaint because the process is tedious. We have decided to come up with an app to make filing of the complaint easier. The app will be available on Google Playstore. Anyone can click a picture of a tree being cut, mark the location and send it on the app. Our department will act swiftly,” said Sanjeev Saran, principal secretary, department of environment, Uttar Pradesh.

(Via: http://www.hindustantimes.com/noida/coming-soon-a-smartphone-app-to-save-trees/story-0HWh5qltbRr5gljVKH6pYI.html)

You can’t just cut down trees (especially in rainforests and other protected areas) because you want to. You need to secure permits from respective government agencies before you can do such a thing. This helpful app can empower ordinary individuals in reporting complaints involving tree abuse so that appropriate actions can be taken to address it and no more trees succumb to the will of man.

It's not everyday that you meet someone like Haritha Rao. The 19-year-old student of environmental science at Mount Carmel College has mapped 600 trees since November last. She recognises species and different types of canopies that trees have.

Rao and many like-minded volunteers have been mapping trees in the city for Talking Earth. The nonprofit was involved in counting the number of trees that were slated to be wiped out by the steel flyover, which was later scrapped.

Rao, a botany student, believes the mapping exercise has taught her much more than her textbooks did."It is time we as citizens know our trees, why they fall and also what trees need to be planted instead of just randomly planting trees without understanding their life cycle," she says.

(Via: http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/small-biz/security-tech/technology/coming-soon-an-app-to-map-citys-shrinking-green-cover/articleshow/58819568.cms)

Technology can be your friend or foe depending on how you use it. The problem with people nowadays is that we use technology to make our lives easier at the expense of the environment. It is a breath of fresh air to finally hear about it being put to good use in helping protect the environment because every effort counts when it comes to environment conservation because the odds are great.

However, there are instances when trees can be dangerous too especially the big ones that fall on houses, other properties and even on people and animals. When trees fall, it is better to get the stump removed too, so you can plant a new one in its wake. The fallen tree can be used in various projects such as furniture making or even used in cooking or making fire. For professional trump removal services, http://www.allcleartree.com/stump-removal got everything covered for you at a reasonable price.

The following blog post Technology Comes To The Aid Of Trees is available on ACTS



source http://www.allcleartree.com/removal/technology-comes-aid-trees

Sunday, 2 July 2017

Trees Know How To Socialize Too

We all know that humans are social animals but do you know that trees are social in nature too? Over the course of time, trees have also evolved in response to stressors or triggers in their environment. We just don’t often hear about it but trees live a pretty interesting life as well. They do look after each other. For instance, let’s take a closer look at acacia trees. They release chemicals once giraffes start munching on their leaves to inform other nearby acacia trees, so they can produce a toxic chemical to protect them even before the giraffe reaches them.

Experts who specialize in trees have conducted experiments and studies to prove that trees interact with one another, do even the mundane of things like going to the toilet annually, and even have sex like humans do. These studies encourage people to see trees in a different light and don’t just think of them as inanimate beings that we believe them to be for deep down, they have feelings too.

Trees are social creatures that mother their young, talk to each other, experience pain, remember things and have sex with each other, a bestselling author has said.

If that persuades you to go and hug the nearest tree, then great, said Peter Wohlleben. Just avoid a birch: “It is not very sociable. Try a beech.”

It’s not surprising to find out that trees are sociable since they are also living things like us humans. The only difference is that we don’t hear them speak or act out how they feel but maybe they do, we’re just oblivious to it or care too little to notice.

Wohlleben wants society to be more aware of trees’ “feelings”. Trees that are close to street lights, which burn all night, will die earlier, he said.

Pollarding trees – removing the upper branches to promote a dense head of foliage – is also a bad thing. “It is like cutting your fingers, it hurts and it damages the tree very heavily. A wound more than 3cm deep can cause a fungal infection and perhaps 10 or 20 years later the tree will rot.”

He said people pruning trees were often not particularly educated about what they were doing, and that they were in effect killing trees.

(Via: https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2017/may/31/trees-talk-have-sex-look-after-young-peter-wohlleben-hay-festival)

Think that you’re so tech-savvy yourself since you are well-versed on the World Wide Web. The trees also have this extensive network known as the “Wood Wide Web”, a fungal network where trees send electric signals to each other in the face of danger. Indeed, there are so much more to a tree’s life that we’ll ever get to know of.

Streetlights are causing the urban trees of the towns and cities of the planet to stay up past their bedtimes, as the natural world falls victim to the modern world's need to have an electric light illuminating everything all the time.

This is coming from tree expert Peter Wohlleben, who says there's lots of research pointing out that city trees growing near streetlights die sooner than their rural equivalents. This is because trees need to sort of sleep a bit at night too, with the artificial lights also affecting their leaf and blossom-producing schedules, further impacting upon their health.

(Via: http://www.gizmodo.co.uk/2017/06/trees-are-staying-up-too-late-as-well/)

If the premise is true, then trees have been suffering for a while now in the hands of man. Jungles and rainforests disappear at such a quick pace leaving thousands of wildlife and insect species devoid of a home in a world that is increasingly becoming inhospitable. On the other hand, plants planted in crowded cities also suffer from the loneliness of their isolation and likewise subjected to various types of pollution that aren't doing them any favor at all.

Whether you believe that trees are social beings or not are purely subjective. Big trees in big cities can pose a danger to people and properties too. Since we don’t want to endanger human life but want to refrain from cutting down more trees, the answer is simple: http://www.allcleartree.com/trimming. No to minimal problems will arise if we learn to coexist with all the living things on the planet. And because trees can’t speak for themselves, let us take the initiative to do the right thing on their behalf so everyone lives harmoniously for all eternity.

Trees Know How To Socialize Too is republished from All Clear Tree Service's Blog



source http://www.allcleartree.com/trimming/trees-know-socialize

Saturday, 24 June 2017

Trees Get Sick Too

Can you remember the last time you were ill? It’s not exactly the best feeling in the world, right? Not only do you look and feel sick but you also miss out on a lot of things at school or at work because we are too sick to even get out of bed. While we dread the onslaught of sickness, they are at times necessary for our body to rest and recuperate. We usually get sick because our immunity went down. When that happens, it takes some time for our body to be back in fighting form with the help of enough sleep, rest, liquids, fruits, and medicines.

We generally think of illness as something that only affects human and animals, it actually comes as a surprise to some that other living things like plants and trees get sick too. And like humans that look sick when they are, you can easily spot a diseased tree too with a trained eye.

Another Torbay woodland is to lose hundreds of its mature trees as a tree disease spreads across the bay's beauty spots. Just a few weeks after more than 1,500 trees were cut down at the Grove on the outskirts of Brixham, hundreds more will go at Occombe Woods in Paignton.

The Forestry Commission have served Torbay Coast and Countryside Trust with notice to fell up to 400 diseased larch trees in an area between Preston Down Road and Occombe Valley Road known as the East Down Plantation.

A similar felling operation carried out at the Grove (below) has left the landscape devastated. Tree felling work has seen wooded areas disappear across Torbay in recent years.The most high profile being the controversial 'natural regeneration' at Churston Woods which saw 1,500 trees come down over the last few months.

(Via: http://www.devonlive.com/hundreds-more-trees-to-be-felled-in-torbay-as-larch-disease-strikes-again/story-30268583-detail/story.html)

We feel for trees that can’t speak and tell us how bad they feel when they succumb to illness. Experts consider a tree sick if it isn’t deemed to survive the next five years or so by measuring the size of the living crown in relation to the bole’s size. A tree will gradually die if only a few leaves are left on a tree with a large bole because it won’t be able to nourish all the tree tissues for nourishment and maintenance. Yellowing of the leaves is also another common symptom along with visible dead tree branches.

Trees are an asset to any community and the people of Vermillion are lucky enough to have trees lining streets and scattered throughout public parks.

Unfortunately, the trees in Vermillion are beginning to show their age and reaching the end of their lifespan. Many are being cut down or destroyed by natural circumstances and are not being replaced.

“We are losing a lot of trees in this town and if you look at little farther, you don’t see anything new being planted,” said Clarence Pederson, a Vermillion resident and member of the Vermillion Tree Board. “I see that Vermillion is a neat looking place. We have a lot of old trees and one of the things that makes it a nice looking place is the fact that we have big old trees, but the fact is they are old.”

Saying that none of the trees are being replaced may be a bit of an exaggeration, Pederson admits, noting that some are being replaced by the city in the public parks. Not enough are being replanted, however, to make up for lost inventory.

A typical lifespan for a tree in Vermillion is 60 years with the potential to survive longer, but most are threatened with the possibility of storm damage and disease. Currently, the biggest threat to the trees in Vermillion is emerald ash borer disease threating the ash trees. Ash trees were planted in response to Dutch elm disease which destroyed the elm trees.

(Via: http://www.plaintalk.net/local_news/article_28cd3e6c-29e3-11e7-a301-27e846c4f9f4.html)

There are trees that have been around for ages and it pains us to see them succumb to illness after providing us shelter and shade for years. However, that’s how life goes. They adapt and their leaves change color with the passing of the season and we witness first hand how resilience they are but a tree disease can easily take the life out of them just like that. So, once it becomes too sick and can no longer be saved, tree removal is the next logical choice especially if there are nearby trees that you don’t want to get infected too. Check this out http://www.allcleartree.com/removal and seek the help of a professional tree removal service company to ensure all dead parts of the diseased tree are removed and the other plants and trees in the area stay healthy and strong for years.

Trees Get Sick Too is courtesy of http://www.allcleartree.com/



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Saturday, 17 June 2017

Are Trees The Answer To Climate Change?

Major changes are happening to the planet at a rapid level. Rainforests are receding, the sea level is rising, the planet is warming, and so much more. Unfortunately, most of these changes are not good ones and especially not good to us and every other living being on earth. Natural calamities have gotten stronger and more disastrous than ever. Add to that the growing threat of human conflicts that make life on earth a living hell.

Amidst all these changes, most people feel helpless and vulnerable. The truth is, we can make a difference in this world in our own little ways. Simple lifestyle changes can have a big impact to how fast climate change is progressing, which is the biggest natural threat we are experiencing nowadays. Trees can also help reduce global warming by removing carbon dioxide and releasing oxygen into the air for the people to breathe. Without trees, we would be stuck as a planet.

Can we use trees and other plants as a weapon in the fight against climate change? Earth's greenery comes with natural carbon-capturing abilities, but now several studies are investigating how to tweak those tendencies to have a maximum impact on carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere.In 2014, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change announced that plants would have to be a major part of the world’s efforts to capture CO2. The idea would be to have trees and grasses suck up CO2as they grow, then burn or process them into fuels to generate power while capturing any CO2 produced along the way. This process is known as “bioenergy plus carbon capture and storage,” or BECCS.

We’re starting to see increasingly large tests of the technology roll out. The Washington Post, for instance, recently reported that a new large-scale trial in Decatur, Illinois, will process huge quantities of corn into ethanol, then grab the 1.1 million tons of CO2 created from fermentation each year and lock it away underground.

(Via: https://www.technologyreview.com/s/604260/can-we-fight-climate-change-with-trees-and-grass/)

Experts are testing how trees can help in trapping and storing carbon in the trees and soil to lower the atmospheric CO₂ levels, so that we can benefit from it more than just the cool shade it provides us against the scorching heat of the sun.

Trees are good for us. Carbon dioxide is one of the major contributors to global warming and climate change. Trees trap carbon dioxide and “exhale” oxygen in return. A mature tree can absorb roughly 48 pounds of carbon dioxide a year, and in turn release enough oxygen to sustain two people.

Trees reduce runoff by storing water from rain. That makes a big difference in our rainy Northwest (45 inches of rain already since Oct. 1). Trees also absorb sound and reduce noise pollution. So if you live near a freeway, plant a couple of trees! If you want to cool off in the summer (whenever that comes), you will appreciate trees reducing the heat from streets and sidewalks.

(Via: https://www.heraldnet.com/opinion/burbank-just-planting-a-tree-can-do-a-world-of-good/)

Trees do the world a lot of good. It’s funny that man needs trees to live for various reasons while trees don’t need anything from us at all yet they are among the first to suffer the most from all the progress we aspire to achieve.

Typically, a tree absorbs as much as 48 pounds (21 kg) of carbon dioxide per year and can sequester 1 ton of carbon dioxide by the time it reaches 40 years old. The average North American generates about 20 tons of CO2-eq each year, which means every year you’d need to plant about 500 trees to offset your carbon footprint, that’s not taking into account the time it takes for a tree to mature and reach the optimal carbon-sinking age. If you’re a New Yorker and need to fly to Berlin, your seat is responsible for generating 10,285 pounds (4,675 kg) of CO2. Essentially, your 8.5-hour-long flight just offset roughly 223 trees. Kudos! If you think this isn’t fair, that’s just life for ‘ya because neither is digging up and burning billions of dead trees accumulated over millions of years which until not too long ago safely stayed miles beneath the ground. It’s no surprise that U.S. forests only capture 10 to 20 percent of the nation’s greenhouse emissions each year.

I somewhat digress because trees are definitely a go-to solution for tackling climate change, which is why scientists are trying to find out not only which are the best species that can handle rising temperatures and dwindling water, but what an idle forest might look like.

(Via: http://www.zmescience.com/ecology/climate/thinning-forest-climate-change432/)

While experts are doing their best to come up with measures to reduce the effects of climate change or look for ways to slow down its progress, all of us still have a responsibility to pitch in and do our part. Even if we close down all factories or stop using anything that produces CO₂ from now on, it still won’t change anything in the atmosphere since its molecule is a very resilient one and can stay suspended in the air for up to two centuries.

With the help of trees, though, we can reduce CO₂ concentration around us and therefore halt the progression of climate change. It may be a very simple solution that has been staring us straight in the face for so long now but why is it that we continue cutting down trees and not plant enough in return?

There are only a handful of reasons why you’d possibly need a tree cut down and we’re not talking about doing it in a bigger scale. Just one or two that blocks your access or is proving to be a hazard in your community especially in urban cities. http://www.allcleartree.com/removal may be of help because they offer professional tree removal services when you need it the most.

The following post Are Trees The Answer To Climate Change? is republished from The All Clear Tree Service Blog



source http://www.allcleartree.com/removal/trees-answer-climate-change

Saturday, 10 June 2017

Insects And Trees: Not Always A Good Match

We live in a world that is home to a wide variety of species that inhabits the land, air, and water. And because we share the same space most of the time, we must learn to coexist, albeit not always peacefully. Survival of the fittest and struggle for existence had always been the mantra in the wild.

Most insects live on and around trees. You can see it everywhere when you go out and commune with nature. However, there are also relationships that aren’t as talked about but are plenty in nature. Some may be symbiotic while most are parasitic in nature. For instance, insects living in trees and feeding on it can mean death for the latter. Fungi also can be dangerous.

A sparse forest is a common sight for this time of year. But in Mendon, the woods are looking more skeletal than usual.

"This tree died two years ago," Rutland City Forester Dave Schneider noted.

The tree is a red pine. And despite its name, it's a little more rustic red than usual. Schneider says the color and lack of limbs are a sign of a devastating disease.

"The branches turn orange, the needles turn orange and then die," Schneider said.

The trees are being attacked by an invasive insect called a red pine scale.

"The insect doesn't actually harm the tree that badly but it carries a fungus very similar to the Dutch elm disease," said Jeffrey Wennberg, commissioner of Rutland City Public Works.

About 100,000 trees are expected to be removed but the disease doesn't make them unprofitable. Schneider says almost all the trees will be sold.

"These trees aren't the most valuable in the forest but they do have certain markets for, particularly with the utility pole market," Schneider said.

(Via: http://www.wcax.com/story/35322430/hundreds-of-vermont-trees-lost-to-insect-infestation)

It is disheartening to see big trees like pines go down because of a mere insect infestation especially when you have to cut them in their prime. However, when the infestation has been too much and several trees have been affected, cutting it down must be done to prevent the infestation from spreading, albeit with a heavy heart. These trees should also be treated to kill the insects before they get the chance to move to the next nearby tree.

A deadly insect that has killed hundreds of millions of ash trees across the East, a scourge that makes the cankerworm look pleasant, is edging toward Charlotte.

The emerald ash borer is an Asian beetle that was first spotted in North Carolina in 2013, in three counties near the Virginia line. The bug has invaded most eastern states, including Virginia and Tennessee, since it was first detected in the U.S. in 2002.

Experts compare the beetle’s lethal potential to the blight that wiped out chestnut trees a century ago and to the insect that is now steadily killing hemlocks across the Southern Appalachian mountains.

(Via: http://www.charlotteobserver.com/news/local/article144984434.html)

All over the world, trees are always threatened by insect infestation. While we don’t usually hear it over the news, countless trees succumb to these little critters day in and day out. Some trees actually have some sort of defense system in place against insects like sap or releases toxins that are hard for the insects to digest. But despite the tree’s best effort, insects are still out to get them.

If you’re an ash tree, here’s some friendly advice.

Get out of town. Fast.

An Asian beetle is munching its way across the Northeast and it’s only a matter of time before it stops in Morristown for a bite, town Forester Richard Wolowicz told the town council on Tuesday.

The Emerald Ash Borer spells certain doom for ash trees: Nearly all of America’s estimated 7.5 billion ash trees will die as this pest advances, according to Wolowicz. Already, an estimated 50 million of these trees have been killed in the Northeast.

By comparison, Dutch Elm Disease took an estimated 75- to 100 million elm trees in the U.S.

Humans can be harmed, too — by branches falling from ash trees that become brittle after the Emerald Ash Borer kills them, the forester said.

(Via: https://morristowngreen.com/2017/04/26/morristown-braces-for-bark-boring-bugs-ash-trees-should-run-for-cover/comment-page-1/)

Trees are an essential part of our natural ecosystem, so are insects. And the majority of insects happen to be herbivores. Unfortunately, insect infestations can not only damage trees but eventually kill them despite their innate natural defenses. We need trees for fresh air but insects also do play a part in life. Whenever possible, always be on the watch out for the presence of insects in your area especially if you have trees at home. A sudden growth in the insect population can mean the end for certain tree species.

For diseased trees that have been overpowered by insects, the only recourse for them is to have them cut down by professional tree removal services. http://www.allcleartree.com/trimming can help you spruce up these trees and be assured that it will be done professionally. While some homeowners would rather tackle this task themselves to save money, you’d realize it would have been easier, safer and more practical to hire a pro to do this than do it yourself because of the risks involved, especially in the presence of infesting insects that can spread to other plants and trees if not taken cared of properly.

The blog post Insects And Trees: Not Always A Good Match was initially seen on ACTS Blog



source http://www.allcleartree.com/trimming/insects-trees-not-always-good-match

Saturday, 3 June 2017

Trees Come To Our Aid

We try to find a use for something in our environment. We either use them for shelter, food, security or whatever we can think of. In our environment, trees are among the most useful resource to us. We use its wood in building homes, furniture, or other wood-related items we use in our daily life. Some fruit-bearing trees also give us fruits that we need for nourishment. Trees also provide us shade when it is hot outside but most importantly, trees provide us with oxygen that all living beings need to breathe and live.

There are other benefits of trees we aren’t aware of. Leaves that fall reduce the temperature of the soil and soil moisture loss. In itself, a tree is already an ecosystem that is home to certain birds and animals aside from also providing them nourishment. Just being with nature also helps us feel relaxed and calm especially when in the countryside or in parks.

“Getting your daily dose of trees is good for your health and easy to do,” said Jennifer Teegarden, DNR forestry outreach specialist. “You can climb a tree, go camping, sit under a tree, take a hike or visit a forest.”

To encourage people to get a daily dose of trees, the DNR is launching the #31DaysOfTrees challenge during Arbor Month. Simply post a photo or video while getting a daily dose of trees on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram. Use the hashtag #31DaysOfTrees and include @MinnesotaDNR when posting to Facebook. Participation will be tracked using hashtag #31DaysOfTrees.

(Via: http://www.voiceofalexandria.com/everything_else/outdoor/dnr-celebrates-health-benefits-of-trees/article_38700e78-2c39-11e7-a3e3-6f5202f7ad9c.html)

Most communities today organize programs to raise awareness on certain causes. Advocacies on the benefits of trees are among those that are celebrated all over the globe because we need trees now more than ever. Imagine how hot it would be living in a world devoid of trees. However, little progress is made in tree planting especially in urban areas.

We really need to do a better job of planting the trees properly, and then, once they are planted, caring for them. One thing that’s come out of the large-scale tree plantings that were popular in the last decade is exactly that realization: that it’s not so much how many trees are given away at an event, but it’s more how many trees actually survive to grow to reasonable size, provide benefits and then not cause too many problems.

To the credit of our policymakers, they recognize this. One thing we’ve learned is that trees do best in places and situations and during times when there’s good cooperation between residents, community benefit organizations and municipal governments. We are not only trying to plant trees that do well today, but we’re also trying to anticipate climate change and what kinds of conditions we might be facing 10 or 20 years from now.

This is a challenge for urban trees in general: They are a very, very long-term investment. So we are looking at the legacy of urban forestry programs from 50 to 100 years ago. That’s why our cities look like they do.

(Via: http://www.latimes.com/opinion/op-ed/la-ol-patt-morrison-igor-lacan-drought-trees-20170503-htmlstory.html)

Indeed, planting trees is a long-term investment that will not only benefit the people of today but more so the future generation. Whatever we do today can impact the lives of everyone in the future especially when it comes to the environment. We can’t just do whatever we feel like doing especially if these are bad habits that damage our surroundings over time. We only stay on the planet for a short while but the effects of our neglect and abuse will stay on for years and years to come.

Taking care of the planet now will leave a positive impression to everyone in the future. We don’t want to condemn them to a life of suffering because we were too lazy to make an effort in saving the planet now when we still can. One of the easiest things to do is to plant a tree. You don’t have to be an expert in doing it and you can plant on a clear space or land where the mature tree won’t likely obstruct anything. When it grows and it does obstruct something, http://www.allcleartree.com/trimming can help trim the tree so there’s no need to really cut it down. We can use one more tree in this world, so count on their professional help to save the life of one tree by trimming it instead of cutting it down.

The blog article Trees Come To Our Aid Find more on: All Clear Tree Service's Blog



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Sunday, 28 May 2017

Live Green To Save The World

We may think that all is well in our own little bubble but when you look around you, you can see that much has changed in the world and it is not always for the better. Tall skyscrapers are everywhere. They are proof of engineering and technological advancements however they may also pose a big risk in the face of calamities. Our carbon footprint increases as we continue to rely on technology in our daily life.

The only way for the human race to survive and prevent further environmental deterioration, both big and small lifestyle changes must be made for the sake of the humanity and the world. A little inconvenience in doing things manually won’t hurt us that much. It’s even an excellent form of exercise, a welcome change from our increasingly sedentary lifestyle.

There’s been a lot of concern recently over the use of pesticides in our homes and gardens, and now a new group in Pacific Grove is taking action and pushing the issue forward.

Non Toxic Pacific Grove formed earlier this year to call attention to pesticide use and to help people and government agencies to look for ways to use less, or none at all.

This subgroup of Sustainable Pacific Grove was among the organizers of the rally this past week at the city’s Monarch Sanctuary in an effort to draw attention to the harmful effects of pesticides on pollinators like bees and butterflies.

But NTPG is also concerned about the effects on humans — in particular, children whose development could potentially be harmed by use of pesticides in schools and parks. That’s why they’re putting special emphasis on creating pesticide-free landscaping and lawns.

The overall message, according to co-organizer Cathy Wooten, is that the fewer pesticides and hazardous chemicals that are around, the better. And Pacific Grove is by no means alone in spreading this gospel — similar groups have sprung up around the country, including Non Toxic Santa Cruz and many others just in California.

(Via: http://www.santacruzsentinel.com/article/NE/20170427/FEATURES/170429713)

Spring has come and we can hear the bees buzzing out and about, forever in pursuit of honey. What many of us don’t see is that pollination is also at work as these bees go back and forth from one flower to another. They ensure the survival of everyone on land for years to come. And we humans too should adopt a sustainable lifestyle for our survival.

Essentially, “sustainable living” defines a lifestyle that attempts to cut an individual’s and on a larger scale, the society’s dependence on the earth’s natural resources.  A huge part of this type of living involves understanding how natural systems function, and the need for the ecology to stay in balance. Jared Diamond, in his book, Collapse: How Complex Societies Choose to Fail or Survive, talks about how several civilizations have fallen as an aftermath of damaging its environment. It is estimated that currently we use about 40% more resources every year than we can put back. This needs to change, but how?

The crux of sustainability lies in accepting that our modern way of life puts a strain on natural resources and that we must figure out ways in which we can progress while ensuring that our actions and consumption habits do not jeopardize the needs of the future generations.

(Via: http://www.theplaidzebra.com/sustainability-10-ways-to-get-started/)

The world’s resources are finite. While we continue to enjoy what the world has to offer now, will there be enough left for future generations? Even trees have been reduced to more than just half of what it used to be because of rapid urbanization and rainforests are converted for agricultural purposes. Instead of cutting trees, we should actually be planting more.

However, tree removal is considered if the presence of a tree is proving to be harmful to the people. It happens when someone plants a tree in an urban location not knowing how big it can get upon maturity. When that happens, call on a professional for help since cutting down trees may be a bit tricky and dangerous if done in a crowded space. Ask the help of http://www.allcleartree.com/removal and they’d gladly do the job for you. However, as much as possible, let trees live if they aren’t posing any threat to anyone because we need more trees now that ever.

The article Live Green To Save The World was first published on The All Clear Tree Service Blog



source http://www.allcleartree.com/removal/live-green-save-world

Trees Succumb To Parasitic Fungi

We may think of microorganisms to only attack living beings like humans and animals. However, trees are also susceptible to microorganisms and it can make them sick, just like how humans succumb to them. For instance, a common problem trees face is fungi. Fungi are actually everywhere. They are even present in the air that we breathe but there are instances when fungi can make you sick. Fungal diseases on man include candidiasis, ringworms or other pathogenic fungal infections.

Fungi actually play a beneficial role in many ecosystems and help the life cycle of various plant species. However, like any other relationships in the planet, some can be symbiotic while others are parasitic. The latter are dangerous to any plant or trees as they live at the expense of their host plant. Most of the time, these harmful fungi attacks already diseased or dying plants but they may at times attack healthy ones too especially if these trees are just nearby.

Fungal diseases kill by clogging the vascular system of the plant, so you will see dieback in the leaves on one side of the plant initially. Citrus trees require good drainage, good aeration (pruning out excessive branches and leaves), regular watering, and fertilizing. Citrus trees like acidic pH soil.

Due to our severe drought for the past several years, this may have stressed out the tree to a point that the fungal disease became a secondary problem since the tree became weakened. Healthy trees are able to wall off fungal diseases to prevent the fungus from entering into the vascular system.

(Via: http://www.sacbee.com/entertainment/living/home-garden/garden-detective/article146212554.html)

Fungi infections on trees are often characterized by slowed growth, dead branches, and smaller leaves or discoloration. Even the removal of a diseased tree is not an assurance that it will likewise eliminate the fungi in the soil. As soon as you see the first signs of fungi growth, promptly cut off the affected part to protect people from accidents caused by falling dead branches, for instance.

If it wasn't bad enough that the emerald ash borer is devastating the local population of ash trees and the woolly adelgids are after our hemlock trees, a deadly fungus that has the potential to destroy countless Oak trees is also creeping into the region.

State foresters discovered oak wilt in two trees in Canandaigua, Ontario County last October and issued an emergency order then in hopes of keeping the infection confined.

And, late last month, the state Department of Environmental Conservation established an Oak Wilt Protective Zone in the Town of Canandaigua. People are prohibited from removing any living, dead, standing, cut or fallen oak trees as well as oak branches, logs, stumps or roots from the zone unless it has been chipped into pieces that are smaller than one inch in two dimensions. Removing any species of firewood from the zone is also prohibited, as it is difficult to distinguish oak from other types of wood when it is cut into small pieces. Non-oak wood leaving the protected zone must be at least 29 inches in length or greater.

(Via: http://www.democratandchronicle.com/story/news/2017/04/08/deadly-oak-fungus-imperils-local-trees/100206016/)

Communities seldom feel the impact of fungi on trees especially when these affect trees that are out in the woods. However, for those that are grown for a purpose, having trees succumb to fungal infections has a big impact on revenue and the loss of a valuable resource. There are various types of fungi present in the environment that can make trees sick. When trees get sick, they don’t immediately die but they suffer for a while and yields are reduced. It’s especially painful if fruit-bearing trees are affected since they are generally grown for a living.

For trees that are already infected, consider: http://www.allcleartree.com/stump-removal to make sure that the tree’s trunk is removed as well so that other nearby trees does not get infected. We hate cutting down trees but when the condition can no longer be salvaged, it’s better to lose one than to put other trees at risk as well. Let the pros handle this task since there are more to cutting down trees than meets the eye.

Trees Succumb To Parasitic Fungi is courtesy of http://www.allcleartree.com/



source http://www.allcleartree.com/removal/trees-succumb-parasitic-fungi

Wednesday, 24 May 2017

Are Your Ready To Plant Some Trees?

The world is a rich diversity of flora, fauna, and animals even before humans came into existence. However, as men learned to harness the resources of the planet and mastered above all creations big and small, nature had to give way (or demolished) for progress to take place. But fast-forward to our present day and we now live in a world overwhelmed by pollution, people, and conflicts.

While we still haven’t found the solution to human conflicts that surround us now, there is something we can do to prevent the continued abuse and misuse of natural resources. One of the best solutions to counteract environmental deterioration is by planting more trees.

For centuries, nature enthusiasts around the world have hosted events to plant and care for trees. At the first U.S. Arbor Day, held in 1872, Nebraska residents planted an estimated 1 million trees. In more recent years, some groups have called for reforestation (planting trees in areas where they had formerly grown but were cut down, burned, or otherwise destroyed) and afforestation (planting trees in areas where they have not historically grown, such as in grasslands) with a new goal in mind: to help mitigate climate change.

When a tree takes in carbon from the atmosphere, it stores it throughout its lifetime through a process called carbon sequestration. The surrounding soil can sequester carbon for even longer periods, for hundreds, sometimes thousands, of years.

(Via: https://eos.org/research-spotlights/can-tree-planting-really-help-mitigate-climate-change)

Climate change is already happening, so there’s no point in spending all your time and energy worrying about it. Instead, start planting trees to help counteract pollution, global warming, and scarcity in resources we all have to deal with because of these global changes. Aside from that, it is refreshing to see trees planted beside roads or on the countryside.

The DTE Energy Foundation and the Michigan Department of Natural Resources are funding more tree-planting projects around Michigan.

The partnership is in its 21st year. Nearly 40,000 trees and seedlings have been planted in over 500 communities. The foundation pays for initiative, which is administered by the DNR's Urban and Community Forestry program.

(Via: http://upnorthlive.com/news/local/partnership-offers-grants-for-tree-planting-projects)

While our personal efforts make a difference in our own little ways, the collective effort of the community has an even bigger impact and is a big help in realizing our goals of environmental sustainability and in slowing down climate change. And the benefits of tree planting, for instance, are felt by more people when many trees were planted.

Planting a tree is as easy as finding a place to dig a hole, right?

Over 100 elementary schoolers from Hartington learned Wednesday that there is a lot more to it than that.

Officials from NPPD hosted an Arbor Day tree-planting event in Hartington. Kids learned about not just the importance of planting trees, but doing so without disrupting the many power lines buried underground.

“Everybody has a conception that a tree doesn’t grow next to a power line or over a power line,” Lammers said. “This is a good age group to get them started with the knowledge that there are certain types of trees that will grow around power lines. It’s just the proper tree in the proper spot.”

(Via: http://kwbe.com/local-news/elementary-schoolers-learn-proper-tree-planting-technique/)

Kids these days learn about advanced technological stuff at a young age. Most kids spend their days glued to their tablets or iPads, watching life pass them by and missing out on the benefits of active play. So, it is a must to teach them important life skills that include tree planting. Getting their hands dirty does not only do them good but the environment as well. A few more trees around us can provide us with the fresh air we desperately need in our growing polluted cities.

You can also contact All Clear Tree Service for any concerns involving trees or planting in general especially if you intend to plant trees in your own yard. You can’t just easily plant trees everywhere now because of certain laws or local policies. But with their help, you get to do your part in helping the environment while at thhttp://www.allcleartree.com/trimminge same time beautifying your home.

The blog article Are Your Ready To Plant Some Trees? is republished from The All Clear Tree Service Blog



source http://www.allcleartree.com/uncategorized/plant-some-trees

Sunday, 21 May 2017

Spruce Up Your Lawn This Spring

All of us dream of having our own homes someday. From a young age, we dream of landing our dream job so we can finally afford to buy our dream home where we can build our own family. And once we do have one, we all consider our homes as one of our most prized possessions.

We spend a great deal of cash making our homes look lovely both inside and out. However, we get cooped up inside for a while during late autumn and winter but we feel liberated once spring comes. Aside from being the perfect time of the year to be outside, it’s also the best time to do some major spring cleaning both in and out of the house.

Tree removal companies were traveling around southwest Oklahoma on Monday. They were responding to calls from homeowners to get the toppled trees off their cars, homes or front lawns. Sunday’s strong winds that reached 40 to 50 miles per hour brought many trees tumbling down.

In this Oklahoma weather, a tree can be damaging and deadly if it's not properly taken care of. The owner of Family Tree Service Pros said doing a little upkeep on the trees in your yard every year can prevent property damage and save you thousands of dollars.

The clean up can be tough. But on Sunday, homeowner Annette Lukasik just happened to be looking outside when the tree in her front yard tree crashed down in her front yard.

"Beyond the wind, I heard a little creaking,” Lukasik said. “And sure enough that branch, I mean, it just happened so fast.”

(Via: http://www.kswo.com/story/35299338/windy-day-keeps-tree-removal-crews-busy)

Spring can be unusually windy as well, so incidents of toppled trees are not new in some parts of the country. While it is easy to get rid of a few branches and cleaning up the mess, it is a different thing if a big tree crashes through your house or gets uprooted on your lawn.

Firefighters and Department of Transportation workers were kept busy on Monday after trees were blown down across roads in Burke County.

Around 12:30 p.m., a tree uprooted and fell on Stephens Road off of N.C. 181, causing several power outages. Fire personnel with Oak Hill Fire and Rescue were on scene chopping up the tree.

Less than two hours later, another large Oak tree fell across Conley Road in Morganton. West End Fire Department and Burke County Department of Transportation were on scene working to get the road cleared.

DOT responded to clear downed trees in numerous places, including on Jamestown Road, Conley Road, Poteat Road and N.C. 126, Mashburn said.

(Via: http://www.morganton.com/news/update-weather-causes-downed-trees-power-outages/article_be4dd634-2ec7-11e7-918c-fb5974ab7084.html)

This is something only the professionals can do. While you can safely do routine spring cleaning tasks, taking care of toppled or uprooted trees is a different matter. You wouldn’t want your lawn to look cluttered and ugly because of this mess especially if there is a big tree stump in plain sight of everyone. http://www.allcleartree.com/stump-removal can help you get rid of the stump in as easy as 1-2-3. Aside from that, they also provide other tree or lawn-related services you don’t feel confident in doing yourself.

Nothing is as satisfying as seeing your home finally spic and span after months of not being able to tend to it. Not only is it healthy to live in a clean space but comfortable as well. The state of the home is also often a reflection of the owner. How well you maintain your house says a lot about your character as a person. You can truly enjoy the better weather and the coming of summer if your home is ready for it too. And it makes perfect sense to clean up your yard since you’ll be spending a lot of time outdoors in the months to come.

Spruce Up Your Lawn This Spring is available on ACTS Blog



source http://www.allcleartree.com/removal/spruce-lawn-spring