Monday, 16 October 2017

When Trees Have Fallen

Trees have been around far longer than us humans. They have filled the earth and made it lush and encouraged other forms of life to grow. They have provided us with shelter and shade from the elements and a source of food among other things. They may fall down on their own or not but still new one grows in its wake. However, as modern life keeps on advancing and the human population also growing, more trees have to give way for civilization to continue.

Many trees have been forcibly cut down to make space for modern developments whether it is for commercial, residential, or agricultural purposes. Yet, it is a depressing thought for environmentalists and virtually all of us who cares for this planet seeing how sparse it already is of trees and other plants. And we are actually paying a high price for this neglect as climate change is no longer just a threat but an actual reality we are living in. While we have come to rely on many of the modern contrivances we are using daily now, some things in this world are irreplaceable and that includes trees that do so much for us without us fully realizing their worth.

Michael Gove has intervened in a long-running battle to try to stop a controversial tree-felling programme in Sheffield.

A number of Sheffield residents have been arrested trying to protect some of the 6,000 trees that face being chopped down as part of a 25-year £2bn highway maintenance scheme called Streets Ahead.

Now the environment secretary has sent a letter to the council demanding an end to the “destruction of thousands of mature trees”, which he said would “damage our children’s rightful inheritance”.

In his letter, addressed to the council leader, Julie Dore, and leaked to the Yorkshire Post, he also expressed concerns about the “transparency in the decision-making process” that identified the trees for the chainsaw.

(Via: https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2017/aug/10/michael-gove-sheffield-tree-felling)

Trees are intentionally cut down especially if they are blocking roads or posing a potential threat in case they accidentally fall down because of strong winds/rain, if they block the view or certain landmarks or if their space is needed to make way for more human progress. Cutting down a tree is understandable in instances where their existence may prove to be harmful to human life or property, other reasons don’t just make sense and not worth it to cut down a tree that has been around for years, decades, or even centuries perhaps.

The felling of 50 trees in De Montfort Hall gardens is under way, despite a last-ditch attempt to have the work put on hold.

Leicester City Council announced last week it intended to cut down a number of trees in the grounds of the popular venue, saying it had become overgrown.

However, councillors representing Castle ward, in which De Montfort Hall stands, said they had not been consulted on clearance work.

Their request for more time to explain the felling to the public was, however, turned down by the council.

The removal of the trees – which are largely purple plums caring from saplings to 40 year-old specimens began on Monday and so far 20 trees have been cut down as part of a £50,000 operation which is likely to take another three weeks.

(Via: http://www.leicestermercury.co.uk/news/leicester-news/tree-felling-underway-de-montfort-224269)

Let trees grow in peace whenever possible. Unless they really pose an imminent threat to us, that’s when the option of cutting them down should then be considered. When that happens, do not try to cut it down by yourself because most of these trees are decades and centuries old, so to say they are huge and heavy is an understatement. Let the pros do it for you, so you can fully relax knowing the job is done properly. They can even get rid of big tree stumps so the space is free and open at last. Check this out http://www.allcleartree.com/stump-removal for professional stump removal services at a price you can definitely afford.

The post When Trees Have Fallen is republished from allcleartree.com



source http://www.allcleartree.com/removal/when-trees-have-fallen

Saturday, 7 October 2017

Trees Get Stressed Too

Humans often feel stressed today. The challenges of daily living have significantly increased in the presence of modern technological advancements. Thinking about how much cluttered the world has become, it is easy to get lost amidst all the new technologies that define modern living. While we may think it is only us humans that get overwhelmed by the various contraptions we now use in our daily life, we are badly mistaken. There are other living beings that co-exist with us in this planet that is mostly always on the losing end against us.

Plants can’t speak up for itself no matter how much they are also affected by the various environmental stressors surrounding them. They may not be able to speak up and tell us how much they suffer from the neglectful things we do but there are certain tell-tale signs that indicate the level of stress they are feeling because of our doing. This is often seen if trees are neglected and not taken cared of properly. Trees can live longer if trimmed when necessary. http://www.allcleartree.com/trimming can take care of your tree trimming needs. They’re just a phone call away and you don’t need to pay a fortune for their services.

I recently had questions about Autumn Blaze maple leaves turning red. Early fall color in trees has also been reported in other counties.

This is usually a sign that maples and other types of trees are responding to stressful growing conditions such as compacted soils, drought or extremes in temperatures. This may also be a response to mechanical damage.

Tightly compacted soil, consistently wet soils from overwatering and drought are detrimental to maples and other trees.

These conditions can cause trees to lose leaves or develop fall color early in the season. The stress is mainly a response to diminished oxygen or water supply to the roots.

(Via: http://columbustelegram.com/news/local/feehan-early-color-change-signals-tree-stress/article_4e2357c0-e75f-54f2-adbe-79176a46c93f.html)

Seeing these symptoms of stress in trees often indicate that if the conditions in their immediate environment do not change and they continue to be exposed to these dangers and risks, they will become more unhealthy and may even die in the next few months and years or so. Their death is not always sudden because the tree still attempts to cope until it can’t any longer.

As the number of droughts increases globally, scientists are working to develop predictions of how future parched conditions will affect plants, especially trees.

New results published today in the journal Nature Ecology and Evolution by 62 scientists, led by Henry Adams at Oklahoma State University, synthesized research from drought manipulation studies and revealed the mechanisms by which tree deaths happen.

"Understanding drought is critical to managing our nation's forests," says Lina Patino, a section head in the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Division of Earth Sciences, which co-funded the study through its Critical Zone Observatories program. "This research will help us more accurately predict how trees will respond to environmental stresses, whether drought, insect damage or disease."

Adds Liz Blood, director of NSF's MacroSystems Biology program, which co-funded the research, "Droughts are simultaneously happening over large regions of the globe, affecting forests with very different trees. The discovery of how droughts cause mortality in trees, regardless of the type of tree, allows us to make better regional-scale predictions of droughts' effects on forests."

(Via: https://www.nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=242634)

Poor soil, extreme temperatures, and other forms of physical damage a tree may sustain can put it at higher risk of disease and insect attacks leaving these poor trees silently hurting and enduring their own internal battles. We may shrug this off and make ourselves believe that trees getting sick and dying are none of our business, but no, we are all interconnected in this planet and our lives are intertwined in the delicate balance of life. Fewer trees mean not enough plants to suck in circulating carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and lead to the consequential problem we are now facing – climate change. All these little things add up and we eventually have no choice but to face the music sooner rather than later.

Trees Get Stressed Too is republished from All Clear Tree Service's Blog



source http://www.allcleartree.com/trimming/trees-get-stressed

Saturday, 30 September 2017

Tree Planting Tips

Since the world is more aware right now of the repercussions of neglecting the environment, we start to realize just how crucial trees are to our life. We can’t just keep on ignoring the harsh realities we are facing because they are a product of our previous mistakes. Fortunately, we still have time to correct our errors and salvage what is there left for all of us. Tree planting is a great way to protect Mother Earth and reduce the effects of global warming and climate change. They are now unstoppable climatic forces that wreak havoc to our weather systems and makes living doubly harder especially once these natural systems act up.

So, why not start planting a tree now and see the world become populated by these lush vertical greens that once dominated the planet? Trees are the foundation of the world’s most important ecosystems. Aside from the oxygen it gives off, they supply us with many of the things we need in order to live. Hence, tree planting shouldn’t be brushed aside but should be taken seriously by every single one of us.

Many mistakes are made when the tree is planted, but often the problems do not appear until later.

It is important to know that tree roots grow outward, like the spokes of a wheel, rather than down. This allows the roots to gather water and nutrients from a larger area, and anchors the tree In all directions.

Tree roots also need air to thrive. Most of a tree’s roots grow no deeper than 18 inches.

When planting a potted tree the hole should be no deeper than the pot, but at least twice as wide as the diametre of the pot. If the roots are wound around they must be freed from the root ball and spread outward.

The tree should be planted no deeper than the level it was at in the pot – planted too deep, the roots will not get enough air. Remember that the soil will settle and you do not want the trunk of the tree in a depression where water can collect and cause the bark at the soil level to rot.

(Via: http://www.thereminder.ca/columns/northern-gardening/northern-gardening-more-tips-for-growing-trees-1.21596535)

You may think planting a tree is an easy thing to do but it is not. You don’t just dig a hole and drop a seed and wait for it to grow. There are various factors you need to consider if you want your tree to grow at all. Even by just planting a single tree at a time, the world becomes a much better place to live in considering the rate of tree cutting loggers is doing now. It takes years for a tree to grow so tall and only a few minutes or hours to cut it down.

The biggest mistake people make while planting trees is planting them too deep or building mounds around the trunk.  If a trunk is below ground it will rot.  “Look for the root flair and make sure that is exposed,” he said.

Primeau also recommended that people keep staking to a minimum.  “I don’t like to stake the trees.  The wind will help train the tree to be strong and resistant to the wind,” he said.

Pruning is also important to understand. Most trees have a “central leader” that comes from the trunk.  If the central leader is pruned it can branch off into two or more central leaders, impacting the appearance of the tree.

(Via: http://oaklandcounty115.com/2017/04/27/tree-time-tips-for-planting-how-to-order-trees-from-city/)

We are not all gardeners who can pull-off magic tricks with plants. Learning these tips about tree planting can make a big difference to your success especially today when trees are needed more than ever. It can take a long while before a tree grows big and tall and capable of caring for itself, so plant the tree right and give it the time and care it needs during the first few years. For instance, trees less than a year old need more water than the ones already upright on the ground. Also, make sure the area is clear and free of obstruction especially from all tree stumps on the ground that has long been deceased. It may be quite bothersome to remove these chunky and heavy tree stumps on your own, so ask the help of the experts regarding http://www.allcleartree.com/removal to make sure your new tree grows up as it should be.

Tree Planting Tips was first published on All Clear Tree Service



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Sunday, 24 September 2017

Tree Conservation: Why The World Needs More Trees

Have you seen the movie adaptation of Dr. Seuss’s book, The Lorax? The story talks about living in a walled city full of plastic – not a single real tree in sight. Despite looking like the perfect community, Thneedville is simply a synthetic version of the world we used to have. Even the outdoors is a depressing and barren wasteland that is devoid of life. Now, the question is, do we want our world to become like that in the future? It may be a possibility considering how polluted the world is now and how much abuse Mother Earth is enduring day in and day out.

Well, it is not too late yet. There is still something all of us can do to protect the planet and preserve whatever there is in the world right now. And whether we like to admit it or not, it has something to do with trees. Trees breathe life to the planet. Can we ever survive without oxygen? The answer is a BIG NO. It’s why conservationists and environmentalists are working double time to educate the rest of mankind about the error of our ways.

Pakistan’s northwestern province, Khyber Pakhtunkhaw (KPK), has planted an unprecedented 1 billion trees in just more than two years and surpassed an international commitment of restoring 350,000 hectares of forests and degraded land.

The massive effort aims to turn the tide on land degradation and loss in the mountainous, formerly forested KPK, which lies in the Hindu Kush mountain range.

Imran Khan, head of the Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf (PTI) party governing the province, launched the reforestation campaign, dubbed “Billion Tree Tsunami,” in 2015.

(Via: https://www.voanews.com/a/one-billion-trees-planted-in-pakistan-nw-province/3983609.html)

If Pakistan can do it, there is no reason that the rest of the world can’t also do it. After all, more hands are better than one. You may even contribute in your own little way and not always at a scale similar to what the Pakistanis has accomplished. Or if you don’t have a green thumb or don’t have space where you can plant a tree of your own, avoid doing things that are detrimental to the environment and try to conserve energy as much as you can. You’d be surprised at how much difference all these things have when done by many.

THE CRITICALLY endangered tree species Shorea lumutensis only found in Perak must be conserved, and promoted as an eco-tourism product to prevent IT from going extinct.

Eco-tourism and Conservation Society Malaysia (Ecomy) co-founder and CEO Andrew Sebastian said the species, locally known as balau putih, can only be found at the high conservation value forests (HCVF) of the Sungai Pinang Virgin Jungle Reserve on Pangkor Island, Segari-Melintang Forest Reserve, and at the Teluk Rubiah Forest Reserve in Lumut.

Sebastian said Ecomy hopes to find ways to develop and package these areas into a proper eco-tourism product following a seven-day expedition to the island that ended yesterday.

Andrew, who was also the expedition’s coordinator, said due to its limited range and distribution, the rare tree categorised as critically endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), must be protected.

(Via: http://www.thestar.com.my/metro/community/2017/07/22/society-calls-for-conservation-of-endangered-tree-species/)

And similar to some animals becoming extinct, tree species can get extinct too. Let us do the future generations a favor and preserve the planet as it is now so they also get a chance to see and live with everything that we now enjoy and not just see them in books because they have long gone extinct. Trees serve lots of purposes.

First of all, trees give off oxygen that is vital to our survival as a species and virtually everything else we need to live – shelter, food, tools, medicine, and so much more. It gives us shade from the harsh heat of the sun and protects us from the cold and the rest of the elements. A planet without trees isn’t home anymore. Let us all unite in saving them from our very own and continue to perpetuate this planet for centuries to come.

In order to avoid cutting down old trees that may be blocking your path or your home, the answer is to trim them. But it is easier said than done. Let the pros deal with it to spare you from the hassle of going up and down trees. Tree trimming does not always need to be expensive, though. Contact http://www.allcleartree.com/trimming for a professional trimming service that leaves you with perfectly trimmed trees without breaking the bank.

Tree Conservation: Why The World Needs More Trees Find more on: The All Clear Tree Service Blog



source http://www.allcleartree.com/trimming/tree-conservation-world-needs-trees

Sunday, 17 September 2017

The Dangers Of Forest Fires

You’ll get amazed of all the wonderful things happening on our planet. All living things big or small make our life so much fun and exciting. However, it’s not always rainbows and butterflies and everything nice. There are cons to living too. Whether it is pollution, human’s evil side, and the wrath of Mother Nature in the form of destructive natural calamities, one can easily perish in an instant if you happen to be in the wrong place at the wrong time.

One of the most understated calamities that can either be man-made or a natural one is forest fires. It can burn millions of acres of land and cross states if the conditions permit. Many animals are displaced because of it and even humans too that live in rural areas and happen to be living nearby. Also known as wildfires or bush fires, forest fires are simply fires happening in rural areas or the countryside that is rich in combustible plants and vegetation. And it is not a new phenomenon because wildfires have been happening for millions of years ago – ever since terrestrial plants first appeared on earth.

This summer, a searing heat wave has helped spawn major fires in the Balkans, parts of Italy and Spain, and southern France and Corsica, as a changing climate affects countries across Southern Europe.

But Portugal has become a particularly stark case of what the future may hold if changes to land, climate and economies go mismanaged.

The deaths in June provoked a fresh round of soul-searching and spurred an investigation, still continuing, into how and why the wildfire engulfed Pedrógão Grande, about 10 miles from where Mr. Muralha lives, close to Oleiros.

Oleiros and its environs are a prime example of the changes to the landscape that have rendered Portugal ever more vulnerable to fire.

The area is a hub for the country’s wood industry. The hamlet where Mr. Muralha lives has just 12 residents, down from about 180 in the 1960s, he said.

(Via: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/08/12/world/europe/portugal-forest-fires-pedrogao-grande.html)

Bush fires aren’t just a problem faced by rural dwellers in the United States but in other parts of the world as well. Most of the time, it takes years and decades of rehabilitation before a place struck by such a calamity eventually recovers. It is a concerted effort by the government, NGOs and the community as a whole alongside the natural ability of the landscape to heal and recover. Trees don’t grow in a day or two. It takes months and even years for some to reach a towering height that is characteristic of trees in the forest.

More than 3,000 firefighters struggled yesterday to put out forest fires across Portugal, after the country requested assistance from Europe to fight blazes that threaten to spread with more hot weather in the coming days.
Exceptionally dry and hot weather ignited
Portugal’s worst fire disaster in memory early this summer, killing 64 people, and fires have continued to flare up in recent weeks with the arrival of each new hotter spell of weather.
Interior Minister Constanca Urbana de Sousa said the country sent the request for help to Europe late on Saturday because of concerns that high temperatures and high winds in the coming days could increase the number of fires.
The minister said the request was carried out “because of a question of prudence” due to the weather forecast for coming days, according to news agency Lusa.
It covered requests for firefighting airplanes and firemen and is part of a European mechanism for co-operation to fight fires.

(Via: http://www.gulf-times.com/story/560130/Portugal-asks-for-help-to-battle-forest-fires)

Not only does the environment suffer in the wake of widespread bushfires but it has an effect on the country’s economy as well. Since some of the natural and raw resources we use in various industries can be found in most forests, it is easy to understand how devastating losing access to these resources is when the forest is now devoid of life. And don’t get me started on the harmful gases it emits that contribute to global warming. The list can go on and on.

However, as damaging as it may be, wildfires actually serve a crucial role in shaping various ecosystems by initiating change to take place. So, no matter how difficult it may be, don’t hesitate in planting anew after tragedies like bushfires. Ensure that dead and burnt trees are removed from the ground. http://www.allcleartree.com/removal may be of help as tree removal is their expertise. Only then can new trees be planted if the old ones are no longer there.

The blog post The Dangers Of Forest Fires Find more on: All Clear Tree Service's Blog



source http://www.allcleartree.com/removal/dangers-forest-fires

Sunday, 10 September 2017

The Story About The Joshua Tree

The planet is full of mysteries the human mind can’t always comprehend. From the intricate design of the planet to the interesting inter-relationships among various species, your mind is blown over and over again as to how we manage to coexist alongside each other, although not always peacefully. Like the Joshua tree, for instance, it has helped shape California’s the Mojave Desert along with its ever faithful companion, the Yucca moths. The symbiotic (win-win) relationship between various species has helped fill the world with living things big and small that live alongside us humans.

It’s funny how even the tiniest of living things can have a big impact on the world. In this case, the Yucca moth helped the Joshua tree pollinate and in the process co-evolved. Experts attest to the fact that their relationship has been going on for years as both need one another for survival. Yucca moth caterpillars only have the Joshua tree seeds for sustenance and the latter won’t be able to thrive without the aid of the moths in pollination.

But in the vast world of plants and their pollinators, there was one example that Darwin deemed the “most wonderful case of fertilisation ever published” in a letter to botanist Joseph Dalton Hooker. This was the curious case of the Joshua tree and the yucca moth. 

We’ll start with the Joshua tree, the Mojave Desert’s most iconic plant. With its spiny fronds and clubbed tufts topped by pungent, waxy flowers twisting towards the desert sky, this desert-adapted shrub has a reputation for otherworldliness. Everyone who passes through the desert remembers the majestic Joshua tree; its namesake has inspired artists, filmmakers and many a sojourner in search of transcendence. 

Few travelers, however, wax poetic about its evolutionary partner, the yucca moth. The small, dun bug is initially unassuming, but upon closer inspection, it is an equally extraterrestrial match for the iconic Joshua tree. Instead of a regular mouthpiece, it sports bizarre, tentacle-like fronds, the likes of which are unique among insects—and serve an essential purpose in the desert ecosystem. 

(Via: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/how-tree-and-its-moth-shaped-mojave-desert-180964452/)

The world works in mysterious ways, indeed. There are many things that happen around us that we are totally clueless of because some are so minuscule we can’t possibly see it with our naked eyes but they contribute greatly to the planet. The humble Joshua tree managed to survive for years just with the help of the Yucca moth and same with the latter.

Some 2 million people flock to southern California's Joshua Tree National Park every year to see its namesake flora and experience its unforgiving desert environment—but those who leave before sundown are missing out. At night the sky comes alive with stars and now it is being officially recognized as an "International Dark Sky Park," a designation given by the International Dark-Sky Association (IDA) to "a land possessing an exceptional or distinguished quality of starry nights and a nocturnal environment that is specifically protected for its scientific, natural, educational, cultural heritage, and/or public enjoyment."

As Desert Sun, a subsidiary of USA Today, reported, Joshua Tree will officially join the list of over 50 other Dark Sky Parks around the world, which draw stargazers and astronomers for clear views of our galaxy, at a ceremony at Joshua Tree's Copper Mountain College on August 12. So why doesn't every remote outpost around the world get the designation? To be a designated Dark Sky Park, the communities that surround it have to actively contribute to minimizing light pollution.

(Via: http://www.cntraveler.com/story/joshua-tree-national-park-to-get-dark-sky-park-designation-for-stargazing)

Aside from the rich history and nature of the tree itself, the place where this tree only grows is also famous as an “International Dark Sky Park” – meaning it is a great place to watch starry nights. It is more reason to head to this renowned park, if not to see the Joshua tree up close but to experience what it is like to see the night-sky away from the blinding city lights. The residents living nearby do their part in ensuring there is little light traffic in the place to preserve its natural light once night time falls.

While trees are welcome in the far rural areas of California where the Joshua tree grows, it’s not the same in San Diego. Some trees can be a bother to the residents, which is why it needs to be removed. For times like this, contact a professional here: http://www.allcleartree.com/removal because you may get hurt cutting down a tree if you do not know what you are doing. Better let the pros deal with it and wait for all the mess to be cleared after. Trees serve their purpose, so when they don’t anymore it is fine to take them down.

The blog post The Story About The Joshua Tree Read more on: AllClearTree.com



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Sunday, 3 September 2017

Trees Dry Up During The Hot Summer Months

Trees are living things as well like us humans. They have needs that must be met in order to grow and thrive in an increasingly inhospitable planet. It also means that they get affected too by a myriad of factors that likewise affects human beings. The climate, pollution, human activities, etc. all make survival doubly harder for every single one of us. Imagine yourself suffering from the extreme heat at this time of the year. You are not alone. Trees feel the heat too and if you just give them the time of day and look a little closer, you’d see them drying up from top to bottom.

Our first instinct is to increase our water intake to fight the heat. It makes perfect sense actually and it is probably our survival instinct taking over that we immediately reach out for a cool and refreshing glass of water to quench our thirst and beat the heat. Plants need as much water too. Seeing tree trunks and barks drying and cracking is a strong indicator that it is likewise in dire need of water and some TLC.

It’s been several weeks since Grande Prairie has seen significant rainfall, and its starting to show. The city’s parks department says local trees are showing signs of drought stress, which is forcing some into early dormancy.

Some of the symptoms include yellowing leaves and dying branches, and without some relief, they could be killed over the winter. The city is asking residents to consider watering their trees and shrubs over the next few days to help, as they will need enough reserves to last them through to next spring.

In order to properly water a tree, people should turn their hose to a trickle, and leave it where rain would normally drip off of its branches. It should be left in several spots for a total of an hour.

“Grass consumes a significant amount of water so shallow, frequent watering does little to
help trees” it’s explained in a release. “Deep, infrequent watering (once every two weeks for mature trees) is much more effective.”

(Via: http://www.mygrandeprairienow.com/31335/dry-conditions-causing-tree-stress/)

But while watering plants and trees help them overcome the heat and lets them stay hydrated all day-long, it isn’t always an easy thing to do. First, droughts are becoming quite common now, so water is becoming more of a precious commodity that no longer always comes for free. Then, the summer months are longer and more intense perhaps because of climate change. Once trees lose their color, dry up, and begin to wilt, they become susceptible as well to disease and insect infestation. Even the oldest and biggest of trees have a hard time staying healthy during long and dry summer spells.

As the number of droughts increases globally, scientists are working to develop predictions of how future parched conditions will affect plants, especially trees.

New results published today in the journal Nature Ecology and Evolution by 62 scientists, led by Henry Adams at Oklahoma State University, synthesized research from drought manipulation studies and revealed the mechanisms by which tree deaths happen.

"Understanding drought is critical to managing our nation's forests," says Lina Patino, a section head in the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Division of Earth Sciences, which co-funded the study through its Critical Zone Observatories program. "This research will help us more accurately predict how trees will respond to environmental stresses, whether drought, insect damage or disease."

Adds Liz Blood, director of NSF's MacroSystems Biology program, which co-funded the research, "Droughts are simultaneously happening over large regions of the globe, affecting forests with very different trees. The discovery of how droughts cause mortality in trees, regardless of the type of tree, allows us to make better regional-scale predictions of droughts' effects on forests."

(Via: https://www.nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=242634)

When it is the time of the year when the heat is just too much and you can’t possibly move a tree somewhere else cooler, try to eliminate any other factors that can cause further stress to the tree like creepy, crawling insects. And while we like to believe that water is the answer to trees drying issues, there is a proper method to watering down a tree. Water it gradually and at soil level. Sprinklers aren’t ideal since only the top soil is soaked and the tree roots remain all dried up. Avoid over-watering it down too since it can drown the tree especially when the surrounding soil already appears soaked with water.

Trees that already died because of the heat and can no longer be salvaged better be removed from the land. Stumps can be problematic, though, as they are huge and grow deep into the ground. Experts at stump removal can help you with this one as they have the knowledge, skills, and manpower on how to do this right. http://www.allcleartree.com/stump-removal is a cost-effective way to get these dead tree stumps removed for good. Now, you can keep on caring for your (still) live and breathing trees and not waste your time, effort, and resources in something that is long gone.

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